Posts Tagged ‘welcome emails’

Whiskey & More has a brilliant welcome email. It’s on brand, concise, humorous, tells you everything you need to know, sets the right expectations, and it does it all in about 60 words.

Why this email is particularly brilliant is that they state that they won’t inundate your inbox with emails,  because they are ‘too busy sussing out great deals on whiskey’.

Which surprisingly, contrary to pushing people away, is actually comforting for the subscriber because it sets expectations up front that they don’t need to be afraid of them flooding their inbox, and drives home the concept that these guys are focussed on what they do best and as a subscriber that makes me feel even more confident in them and their products and services.

It makes me look forward to the very infrequent emails I will be receiving, because supposedly they will be packed with some fairly impressive whiskey deals, and really from a whiskey company that is what you sign up for right?

Whiskey&More

Click on the image to see the full version of the email

 

Back in 2008 we saidWelcome emails have a huge advantage in that they are the most opened of all emails you’ll ever send

Back n 2010, we saidThe email you send to welcome a new subscriber or customer is always the most read email you will ever send

Back in 2011, we saidThe welcome email is the most important email you send because for many of your subscribers, it’s their first email experience with your brand, and perhaps their first interaction with your company

In 2012, we saidEmail provides the highest ROI of any digital marketing channel, and that welcome emails provide the highest ROI of all

Whether it’s the first time someone registers for your e-newsletter, the first time they walk into your showroom, or their first on-line purchase, first impressions can make a huge difference to whether the prospect is ‘in’ or ‘out’ of your on-going eDM program – and with lifetime value measurements, your on-going revenue!

We have been writing about welcome emails for years. It’s always good to recap so we thought we would bring all our welcome posts together and all the best and worst welcome email examples we have collected and give you a grand line up of welcome emails. We have gathered more examples of welcome emails for you to look at, comment on, learn from and copy for your own welcome email program. We have underlined key areas of each Welcome email, and each thumbnail links to a larger version of the email image. Also each company name below links to their website.

Example 1: We Heart It is a new site like Pinterest, that allows you to find and collate images and share them. I just signed up the other day and they sent me this nice welcome email. It is a clean, simple email that covers what it needs to, introduces you to the site and provides some key links for the subscriber, including links to download their app.

Example 2: Polyvore is a fashion site where you can create outfits, collate items that you like, mix and match products and share it with others while offering brands insight into their customers. Their welcome email, like WeHeartIt, is a clean, simple email that covers what it needs to, introduces you to the site and provides some key links for the subscriber, including links to download their app.

Example 3: KNOW from Positively Wellington Tourism is a top quality e-newsletter that features all the latest events, places, people and news that is going on in Wellington. The KNOW welcome email itself is simple yet smart. It  clearly and concisely sets the expectations to the subscriber the frequency of communication, the type of content, reminds you of the email address you registered with, it links to key content on their site, they invite you to connect with them on all their social networks, it even allows you to invite friends. They even link back to the subscribe page in case you forward this email – allowing a clear path to subscribe if the friend you forwarded it to wants to sign up too. We can’t find a thing wrong with this email, can you? (Disclosure: KNOW is a client of our agency, Jericho)

Example 4: Anthropologie is an office favourite here at Jericho. We love the gentle design and the clever copy in the Anthropologie emails. The Welcome describes the frequency and content of the emails, and they invite you to help the emails arrive by adding them to your address book.

Example 5: Alice is the shopping site where you can buy all your non-perishables, leaving you free to get your fresh supplies from your local markets. The Alice Welcome email includes clear calls to action to get started – the best place to do this is in the welcome email. Could improve: They mention emails they will send that are related to your activity, but no mention of what else they will send or how frequently.

Example 6: Old Navy  If a Welcome offer for your first purchase is what you are after, Old Navy is here to help with 20% off your first purchase. In their welcome email they link to their family of brands, to their Social Media profiles, and offer T&C’s for the promo. Could improve: There is no description of email frequency or content, and there is no way to share the email to your social networks which means missing out on the newly engaged readers propensity to share right when they are most excited to meet you.

Example 7: Rachel Zoe  earns a special mention before we even examine the Welcome email. That’s because as you’ll see if you visit the site, the home page is all about the email registration. It is unthinkable how many websites we find that force you to search to sign up for email. The best email marketers (including the GAP family of sites) use the priority real estate of their home page to sell you to the sign up. If you make money sending email then your number one goal should be to get the email address of your site visitor. Sure you want them to look around, but if you get the email address you get the chance to make your case time and time again… This Welcome email does a number of things right. It welcomes warmly. She sets expectation of frequency, and content. She covers the housekeeping with how to get the email delivered to you and tell your friends, and a nice obvious unsubscribe too.

Example 8: The Whiskey Shop email is a basic looking email with a value-add which incentivises the registration, The Whisky Shop from Auckland nails a great Welcome on a low budget.


Example 9: Underground Skate has a basic email that covers what it needs to and major subscriber engagement – works so well because of the style, and copy. In fact their copy is so good we have previously done a whole blog post on it which you can read here.

 

Example 10: Outstanding in the wrong way this welcome email misses the mark in almost every way. Dull, unengaging and confusing. It was also sent in the middle of the night long after I had subscribed. This is a major Government department and although we expect them to be a bit behind there is simply no excuse for emails like this leaving the building. The newsletter it prefaces is a useful and important communication, however it is let down by this welcome email. Check out the reply email address. Not only am I unlikely to retain this email for future reference, as am I commanded to do, I am actually a little bit frightened of it.

We would like this to continue to grow into the best resource for welcome email examples on the blogosphere. You can help! Comment on these ones, and send examples of emails you have received, good or bad, email us!


Even though it’s likely you are still focusing on your Christmas ‘recovery’ and easing back to work, it’s never too early to think about your 2013 email marketing program.

For some this year might be about reviewing your budget and allocating more resources towards your email communications program in order to set in place the best of the basics.  If you are already more established and ‘mature’  in your approach to email then you are continually reviewing your email communications program and are evaluating it to see how you can enhance what you’re doing.

Either way if you really want to power up your email marketing, below are some of the biggest shifts and trends at the moment that you should now seriously be thinking about how you could make this work better for you.

1. From mobile optimised to mobile first
Given that most email opens now happen on mobile devices, simply optimising your email message for mobile devices is becoming more of an outdated notion. On the other hand – while optimising designs for mobile is now crucial, don’t forget that context is just as important. And a mobile first approach means that landing pages and your Web site are also designed to convert mobile readers of your email.

2. From dry to juicy
Things have changed in the way customers expect to communicate with companies and what they want from them. Gone is the notion of editing content to within an inch of its life to take out any human presence and get it past the lawyers. It’s now about taking a different approach that involves sending content that educates, informs, engages and entertains. This doesn’t mean you abandon your professional corporate speak for the ‘LOL’-speak, however it’s about balance – customers just want to know they are dealing with humans that care.

3. From 1-1001 to 1-1
Batch and Blasts (where everyone gets everything) should have died out along with the Spice Girls. So it is really time to shift to automating more parts of your email program, where the subscribers themselves determine the frequency and cadence of the emails they receive through their own purchases, check-ins, behaviour and interests. It is those smart cookies that use the data they have to deliver real-time emails with truly dynamic and personal content.

4. From welcome message to boarding program
There is a shift away from firing out a ‘welcome’ message and then dumping subscribers into your main communication feed, to gently warming them up with a series of on-boarding messages that are tailored toward new recipients.

5. From one-off to email series
Did you know cart abandonment follow up emails get the highest engagement rate of all emails? Followed by birthday series emails.  Reports show a three-part birthday or cart-abandonment series always significantly outperform a single email. We have heard of people getting average conversion rates of 22%, 15% and 24% with a three-part cart-abandonment re-marketing series. How much money would it have lost if it had stopped after the first message?

Worth thinking about…. Email or call us if you want to talk strategy and email communications planning for 2013, we are elbow deep into work with many clients already and in the coming months they will be very pleased we did!

 

If you are not already doing triggered welcome emails, you probably should be. Here at Jericho we encourage clients to look hard at what they are doing repetitively, and at their customer life cycle, and look for opportunities to add value and human touch.

It’s not surprising that timely, and relevant emails have the highest engagement rates, and deliver much better ROI than your usual ‘run of the mill’ emails.  And birthday emails have even higher engagement rates than other types of triggered emails?

“Triggered email is a really under used trick of email marketing, and just like optimising emails for mobile – if you are not already doing it, you are leaving your customers out in the cold.”

Triggered emails have higher opens, lower unsubscribes, and higher engagement rates, often leading to significant spending (just to name a few good things!) because they are personal, relevant and specifically targeted to the recipient.  They feel different.  They feel like they are ‘just for me’ – because they are.

The email relates to an event: an action the person has just performed or a date specific to them. So it goes without saying they will respond more positively to a triggered email that relates to them or something they are doing, or have just done. Welcome emails are STILL not used by many businesses, and studies have shown that the difference between getting a warm welcome, and not, can be many many thousands of dollars over the lifetime of that person. Post purchase & post visit work great too.  We have a client who sends a personal letter to everyone who visits their premium car showroom.   Other ideas are almost in the ‘infinity’ range!  Just ask us!

One of the hardest thing about email marketing is to consistently send emails that are relevant, personal and timely. Triggered email is the solution that makes the hardest thing the easiest thing by allowing you to automate your ‘customer love’.  Imagine if you could just tell your girlfriend that you love her and cook a lovely dinner once, and then hit a button and have it roll out every time she looks a bit sad!  Voila!

Triggered emails are triggered from a meaningful event or date such as a birthday, anniversary, online purchase, or membership club sign up. So you need data to trigger the email. This is where data collection and having a clean database is so important. However if you don’t have the data to create the triggers, you could use the email series functionality. You can use this as Jericho does and set up a series of welcome emails, where when someone signs up it triggers a series of emails to be sent at certain intervals (Once a week for a month for example) and each email could show the subscriber a new tip, or different information or new advice each week.

“Did you know welcome email series out-perform normal welcome emails in terms of ROI –this is even more under used and undervalued email marketing tool.”

Yes, yes, it all sounds great, however before you jump in; you need a plan.  You need to think about  your overall objective. Is it to get more customers? Sell more to each customer? Build reviews on your website?  Be the most credible company in your niche?   Whatever it is, a combination of measurable objectives and value to your subscribers will result in a more positive sentiment and higher engagement. (We will talk more about this in a future blog post).
So where to start? Well one of the best things you can do, both in terms of using triggered email functionality and increasing engagement, is to send Welcome emails, and triggered birthday emails.

As we’ve noted before, once you reach about 11 your birthday becomes less of a big deal, so when someone takes just a moment to remember your birthday it’s a lot better than nothing!   Yes as a business you don’t want to look creepy by knowing their birthday, however with the right copy and the right tone, sending a friendly yet professional birthday email is one of the nicest things you can do and you will undoubtedly brighten your subscriber’s day.   If you don’t have anything to sell then just say Hi!  But don’t underestimate the willingness we all have to buy ourselves the treat we won’t get from our loved ones!

Are you doing triggered emails now and perhaps want to supercharge them? Integrate dynamic content into your triggered emails…. For example you could use dynamic content to show the items in their shopping cart they ‘forgot’ or send different weather updates to people in different areas. There are many ways you could use triggered emails, and our team have lots of ideas.

If you want to talk about how you could use triggered emails, email series, and birthday emails to enhance your email marketing comms program, talk to your you Account Manager or the Jericho service team – phone 09 360 6463 or email accountservices@jericho.co.nz

Seeing as the most searched for topic on our blog is ‘welcome emails’ you might also want to read our ‘welcome 101 master class post,  and then you can view email welcome examples in our top-rated post on ‘8 outstanding welcome email examples’ to get you started.

In this post, we’ve broken down the word “Welcome” as an acronym to provide a little inspiration in bite size chunks on the topic of welcome emails.  We picked the words below to highlight what we think are some of the more important components of a good welcome email strategy. Now, you might have your own words for some of these, and that’s fine. In fact, we’d love for you to add your suggestions in the comments!

W – Why
Why are you sending the email? What are you welcoming them for? This will determine the style of the email, when you need to send the email, and what you require your subscribers to do once they receive the email.

E – Engaging
This is potentially the first email they will have ever received from you – make it great! Make it so wonderfully enticing your recipients open it, and make sure it represents your brand, so that when they get your emails in the future they will know it’s you and they will open it.

L –Love your subscribers
Show them the love! Don’t just send an email saying ‘Thanks for signing up’ – where’s the joy in that? If they have just subscribed, or just signed up to something with you, or just purchased something in store, tell them you appreciate it, say thanks, offer them something.

C – Clickthroughs
Is there a call to action required from this welcome email? (You will get this from the questions in the ‘WHY’ section) Would you like recipients to clickthrough to a voucher, or your website for example? Have a good call to action that makes this obvious.

O – Opens
Good design and good copy is key. Make it relevant, timely, attention grabbing and appealing. That way you will ensure new customers or new subscribers will open your welcome email and get the information they need from you instead of mistaking it for more junk and deleting it and missing that vital new customer 50% off voucher!

M – Mandatory
We say mandatory because we believe welcome emails are that important and that effective. And if you don’t already have a welcome email campaign set up, contact design@jericho.co.nz and our design team can put some concepts together for you.

E – Ever and Ever
First impressions count right? If you want this recipient to keep coming back and showing you the love for ever and ever impress them off the bat and you’re more likely to hold on to them as a subscriber.

S – Series
Plural ‘welcomes’ to us means ‘welcome series’! Welcome series are great for when people visit your website, and generally they have limited time to get the gist of what it is you are great at.  So you use a welcome series to extend the education period. For example you could say ‘Sign up to our monthly news updates and we will welcome you with 5 ways to get the most from us’ then, you can use triggers in SmartMail PRO to deploy a series of emails at set times– perhaps weekly, or twice in the first week then one a fortnight.  Or even better, use the series as your sign up incentive – you could say “Sign up for our newsletter and we will send you our ‘3 ways to save money when you shop.’” How enticing is that?

 

You are welcome!

Following on from our last post on the art of the Welcome, we’ve gathered some examples here for you to look at, comment on, learn from and copy for your own welcome email program.

Also check other posts here like “You are not alone – 2 campaigns we love, and why” and one from right back in 2008 “Welcome Warmly“.  In all, there are 22 months of blog posts here at Jericho’s GetSmart Blog to help your email marketing performance.

Welcome messages are so important. A survey published in MarketingSherpa’s Best Practices in Email Marketing Handbook found that:
– 54% of respondents stated that they open and read transactional messages “very often or always.”
– Only 21% of respondents reported opening and reading other opt-in email with the same frequency.
Out-take: The Welcome email is 150% more likely to be opened and read than your email newsletter.

We have underlined key areas of each Welcome email, and each thumbnail links to a larger version of the email image.  Also each company name below links to their website.  (As we have said before one of the best ways to improve your email marketing is to spy!)

Whether it’s the first time someone registers for your e-newsletter, the first time they walk into your showroom, or their first online purchase, first impressions can make a huge difference to whether the prospect is ‘in’ or ‘out’ of your ongoing eDM program – and with lifetime value measurements, your ongoing revenue!

Example 1: A basic email that covers what it needs to and major subscriber engagement – works so well because of the style, and copy, really.  I’ve written about that before, so I’ll just link to that – Welcome to US.

Example 2: Another basic looking email with a value-add which incentivised the registration, The Whisky Shop from Auckland nails a great Welcome on a low budget.


Example 3: Alice.com – I wish we had this in New Zealand.  The shopping site where you can buy all your non-perishables, leaving you free to get your fresh supplies from your local markets.  The Alice.com Welcome email includes clear calls to action to get started – the best place to do this is in the welcome email.  Could improve: They mention emails they will send that are related to your activity, but no mention of what else they will send or how frequently.

Example 4: Anthropologie.com An office favourite here, our design and production teams love the gentle designs and copy in the Anthropologie emails.  The Welcome describes the frequency and content of the emails, benefits first is always good.  They also invite you to help the emails arrive with an action of your own – add to your address book.

Example 5: OldNavy.com An Welcome offer for your first purchase might be just what you are after.  If so, Old Navy is here to help with 20% off your first purchase.  They link to their family of brands, to their Social Media profiles, and offer T&C’s for the promo – BUT – no description of email frequency or content, and no way to share the email to our social network – missing out on the newly engaged readers propensity ot share right when they are most excited to meet you - a useful trick that is overlooked here.

Example 6: KNOW from Positively Wellington Tourism is a top quality e-newsletter that you should subscribe to.  The KNOW Welcome email is on the money in every way.  They set up the anticipation of frequency, describe the content type, remind you of the email address you used to register, invite you to follow and fan them, and link to key content areas with site-matching nav tabs - PLUS they invite you to share the email to your social networksinvite a friend to subscribe too, and they even link back to the subscribe page in case you forward this email – allowing a clear path to subscribe if the friend you forwarded it to wants to sign up too.    I can’t find a thing wrong with email, can you?  (Disclosure: KNOW is a client of our agency, Jericho).

Example 7: RachelZoe.com The Rachel Zoe website earns a special mention before we even examine the Welcome email.   That’s because as you’ll see if you visit the site, the home page is totally about the email registration.  It is unthinkable how many websites I find that force you to search to sign up for email.  The best email marketers (including the GAP family of sites) use the priority real estate of their home page to sell you to the sign up.  If you make money sending email (and you do if you do it right) then your number one goal should be to get the email address of your site visitor.  Sure you want them to look around, but if you get the email address you get the chance to make your case time and time again…  Next blog post = tricks to great subscription forms!  This Welcome email does a number of things right.  It welcomes warmly (she is ‘beyond excited’ to have you aboard).  She sets expectation of frequency, and content.  She covers the housekeeping with how to get the email delivered to you (‘imagine the disaster…’!), and tell your friends, and a nice obvious unsusbcribe too.

Example 8: Outstanding in the wrong way this welcome email misses the mark in almost every way.   Dull,  unengaging, confusing.  It was also sent in the small hours of the morning hours after I had subscribed.   This is a major Government department (the NZ equivalent of the IRS) and although we expect them to be a bit behind there is simply no excuse for emails like this leaving the building.  The newsletter it prefaces is a useful and important communication, let down by this welcome.  Check out the reply email address.  Not only am I unlikely to retain this email for future reference, as am I commanded to do, I am actually a little bit frightened of it!


We would like this to continue to grow into the best resource for welcome email examples on the blogosphere.  You can help!  Comment on these ones, and please send examples of emails you have recieved, good or bad, to us at getsmart@jericho.co.nz

Writing great content about emarketing takes time, and the more people who read it the better, so please help us to grow – and read our other posts – we have lots of original articles here.  Link to our blog, tell your friends about the GetSmart blog and use the SHARE links below to post to Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.

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The email you send to welcome a new subscriber or customer is always the most read email you will ever send.

You will never send an email that is read more eagerly than the welcome email.

The welcome email is the most powerful chance you have to achieve every marketers goal of ‘customer engagement’.  Yes, I am being slightly monotone and repetitive – I’m aiming for a hypnosis effect so it gets in!

Because this email is so very important, it is the time when you should concentrate on these key aims:

  • Set the tone of your ‘voice’
  • Establish the terms and boundaries of your ongoing relationship
  • Brief your newbie so they can anticipate your next move(s)
  • Instill confidence and build credibility
  • Take the newbie by the hand and ease them over towards your end goal
  • Request no more than one action, but draw attention to other possibilities in the future

I’m going to look at each of these parts of the Welcome Email, and then I’ll post some examples of welcome emails that get it right.

Set the tone of your ‘voice’

Use the genuine voice of your company, some personality is preferable.  Don’t be too folksy though, this welcome is setting the tone of how your emails, your website, your call centre, and your bricks’n'mortar presence should sound.  In fact I think you should forget about ‘single view of the customer’ until you have established a single ‘tone’ of your organisation.

Establish the terms and boundaries of your ongoing relationship

Make it clear what they have registered for, and how you will use that permission.  Plain english works well here. One of the most comforting things is a phrase such as ‘we will never, ever, share your details with anyone else, or use them for any other purpose other than what you have asked for’.

Brief your newbie so they can anticipate your next move(s)

Seth Godim said it best 10 years ago: ‘Great email is personal, relevant and anticipated’.  Anticipation is key.  No one wants a rude surprise.  Every single email is greeted with a thought process that goes something like this ‘who are you, and why are you sending me this’.   Setting up the terms, and the anticiaption means that the path is clear for you to deliver the goods, and grow that permission, to paraphrase Seth again ‘from stranger, to friend, to customer, to advocate’.

Instill confidence and build credibility

If you are good at something, now is the time to quietly reinforce that. Link to testimonials and awards, use language which makes it clear they have done the deal with just the right kind of people.

Take the newbie by the hand and ease them over towards your end goal

You might like to reinforce what it is that you aim for, in line with your overarching goals for this person.  Do you want them to buy something? Offer a time limited coupon or offer.  Do you want them to advocate for you?  Give them the tools to share to their social networks or refer a friend.  And so on.

Request no more than one action, but draw attention to other possibilities in the future

If you need them to do something, remember this is DM!  Ask for it and make the action, simple, obvious and easy.  If you just want them to look around your website, or sit tight and wait for the next stage of your program, then make it clear that they can do that and entice them with some ‘easy’ steps they can take to view your content, for example.

We have written other posts on Welcome emails in the past, you will find other ideas here:

Underground tips for us – Hall of Fame (a great welcome email example)

Welcome warmly…! (basic tips)

The 1st of 3 Best No-Brainer Ways To Improve Your Email Newsletters (all about spying!)

If you have a brilliant Welcome program then please share it with us with a comment, or if you would like them, our team are ready and waiting to guide you to make the most of the incredible potential that the Welcome email offers you.

To read our weekly blog posts for the most comprehensive posts on emarketing, and email marketing in New Zealand, click the JERICHO logo at the top of the post here, and pick through the menu on the right hand side, or use the Search box.